What to see in Rome

Piazza del Popolo – The Piazza del Popolo is a large oval square in northern Rome that has been around since the days of the Roman Empire. At one time, it was the start of the most important road north. Three churches border the square but the eye-catcher is an obelisk from ancient Egypt. On the north side the square is dominated by the Porta del Popolo, which leads to the Via Flaminia, a road connecting Rome with the Adriatic coast.

The Pantheon – the best preserved monument of Roman antiquity – is remarkably intact for its 2000 years. This is despite the fact that Pope Gregory III removed the gilded bronze roof tiles, and Pope Urban VIII ordered its bronze roof stripped and melted down to cast the canopy over the altar in St. Peter’s and cannons for Castel Sant’Angelo. The Pantheon was rebuilt after damage by fire in AD 80, and the resulting brickwork shows the extraordinarily high technical mastery of Roman builders. Its 43-meter dome, the supreme achievement of Roman interior architecture, hangs suspended without visible supports – these are well hidden inside the walls – and its nine-meter central opening is the building’s only light source.

Santa Maria in Trastevere – Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of the oldest churches in Rome, with most historians believing it was first built in the 4th century. The church has impressive mosaics from the 12th and 13th centuries; it has been enlarged and restored over the years. Located in the popular Trastevere neighborhood, its atmospheric piazza is enhanced by the mosaics on the fa?ade, especially at night when the church and its tower are illuminated. Read more on Rome Tours

St. Peter’s Basilica

One of the holiest sites for the Christian faith, the Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican, as it is so-named is one of the greatest examples of Renaissance architecture and one of the largest churches in the world. It contains the burial site of Saint Peter, one of the 12 Apostles of Jesus Christ and the first Pope. St. Peter’s Basilica is best known for its enormous dome, designed by Michelangelo in the 16th century.

Free things to do in Rome : Toss Three Coins into the Trevi Fountain

No trip to Rome is complete without a visit to the beautiful Fontana di Trevi. Have a look at Nicola Salvi’s late Baroque waterworks influenced by an earlier try by Bernini, then follow the Roman tradition of throwing a coin into the fountain to guarantee a return to the Eternal City.

The fountain dates back to ancient Roman times in 19 B.C. when the Roman aqueduct was constructed. The aqueduct brought water to the Roman baths and the fountains of central Rome. The fountain was built at the end of the aqueduct, at the junction of three roads.

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