China attractions and regional tours

5 top attractions in Xian? Xian City Wall The main magnet of Xian is the city wall, which is the most complete city wall that has survived in China as well being one of the largest ancient military defensive systems in the world. It was enlarged in Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) from the city wall initially built in Tang Dynasty (618 -907). Now it is 12 meters tall, 12-14 meters wide covering 14 kilometers in length with a deep moat surrounding it. You can walk, even cycle on the wall. Its south gate is the most largest with a suspension bridge. Most of the tourists choose the south gate for sightseeing.

Tian Tan Buddha – or as it’s better known, the Big Buddha – is Hong Kong’s most recognisable and iconic landmark. It was 12 years in the making: 34 metres high, and accessible to visitors by a gruelling 268-step route up to its seat. Needless to say, be prepared for aching legs by the time you’re at the top. Just beside the Buddha is Po Lin Monastery, a wondrous, incense-filled sanctum that ranks among Buddhism’s most importart institutions. And if that slog gives you an appetite, head to the neighbouring Ngong Ping Village for a traditional Buddhist vegetarian meal.

China is an awesome place if you are looking for ancient history mixed with modern attractions exploration. In China’s mountainous northeastern region is the old city of Shenyang, an important center for trade and culture and home to the Mausoleum of Light (Zhaoling), also known as the Northern Imperial Tomb. One of northeastern China’s most important historic sites — it’s included on the UNESCO World Heritage Site’s list of Imperial Tombs of the Ming and Qing Dynasties — the tomb is noted for its unique architectural style: a combination of traditionally arranged Chinese burial sites and castle-like buildings of the early Qing period. Buried here in a vast site covering more than 180,000 square meters that took eight years to complete is Emperor Huang Taiji, who reigned from 1626-35. The site is notable for its “Path of Souls,” a laneway lined with stone columns and sculptures of the emperor’s favorite horses. Another important site is the imposing Imperial Palace dating from the early Qing era, the second largest completely preserved palace complex in China after the Imperial Palace in Beijing. The complex served as a residence for the first Qing Emperors and includes several splendid courtyards around which are grouped numerous buildings, including the Hall of Exalted Government (Chongzheng Dian) housing the imperial throne. Read additional information at Shanghai to Xian tour.

Erected mostly in the early 20th century, the fortress towers at Kaiping were built by famously outbound Kaipingers, who brought home the many architectural styles they saw abroad, including Islamic, Roman and even ancient Greek. The towers were built as a display of wealth, and as a practical way of protecting locals from war and theft. Approximately 1,800 fortress towers still stand amid Kaiping’s vast rice fields. Kaiping is located 130 kilometers southwest of Guangzhou, the provincial capital of Guangdong. Regular buses are available between Kaiping Bus Terminal and various long-distance bus terminals in Guangzhou. Direct buses and ferries are available between Kaiping and Hong Kong.

Located in the very heart of Beijing, magnificent Forbidden City, also known as Imperial Palace Museum, is the symbol of imperial power. Built in Yongle Period, Ming Dynasty (1406 – 1420 AD), it is the largest and well-preserved wooden building complex of the world. These were laid out very precisely in accordance with a feudal code of architectural hierarchy which designated specific features for reflecting the paramount authority and status of the emperor. Forbidden City can be taken as a sample of the traditional Chinese palatial architecture. In 1987, it became a World Heritage Site. Besides, it is also listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world.

Perched precariously halfway up a cliff some 75 meters (246 feet) above the ground, the Hanging Monastery is one of the most remarkable sights in China. Consisting of a complex of 40 rooms linked together by mid-air corridors and walkways, this remarkable monastery appears to be glued to the side of a sheer precipice. The original monastery was built in the 5th century and has been repaired and extended many times during its long history. Reed Flute Cave known as “the Palace of Natural Arts” is located in the northwest of Guilin in southern China. According to a legend, Reed Flute Cave got its name because people believed that the reed by the cave’s mouth could be made into flutes. The limestone cave offers a majestic fairyland of stalactites, stalagmites, stone pillars, stone curtains, birds, plants and animals in fantastic shapes and colors. Discover extra information at https://www.chinaxiantour.com/.

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