Awesome Greece yacht sailing places and boat sailing recommendations today by IntersailClub

Amazing Greece yachting locations and yacht sailing recommendations 2021 with IntersailClub? Synonymous with romance, culture and rustic charm, the Amalfi Coast is one of the darlings of the Mediterranean. This region is worth a visit for those in search of timeless beauty, proper Italian dining and UNESCO-listed heritage. Begin on the south side of the coast with a trip inland to Ravello, a medieval village that sits at dizzying heights above the sea- take a walk around the gardens of Villa Rufolo, then enjoy a meal at Palazzo Avino overlooking the mountains and the sea. Evening aperitifs are best enjoyed at Le Sirenuse, a chic hotel in Positano decked out in colourful majolica tiles with a terrace that offers unbeatable views over the town. Then, be sure to head down to the commune of Nerano to dine at one of two celebrity-approved restaurants; Lo Scoglio da Tommaso and La Conca del Sogno.

Italy has an extensive Mediterranean coastline, speckled with unbelievable islands, beaches, and beautiful towns. Sailing around southern Italy is always a popular choice for European cruise holidays. What makes this area even better is its close proximity to Greece – allowing you to include both countries easily into your sailing itinerary. As Italy has a rather lengthy coastline, the different destinations each offer something completely unique. Some of the best places to visit in Italy for a sailing holiday include Sardinia, Amalfi, the Aeolian Islands, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and Sicily. The Cinque Terre is another great coastal destination for those interested in sailing further north.

The brackish inland sea is bound by the Scandinavian Peninsula, Europe mainland and the Danish islands. Although most of us would not think of going island-hopping in Germany, it offers some really unique locations. Start at Stralsund and include the wild sweeping landscapes of the car-free Hiddensee island and the deserted white sand beaches of Rugen island. If you can, extend your trip to include the beautiful Stockholm archipelago and the Danish Islands which includes Isle of Langeland where wild horses roam. Read more info at Mediterranean yacht cruises in 2021.

Aside from seasons and events, yachts of the same size may also differ in price and this may be down to a vast difference in on board amenities. A yacht which boasts an on board cinema or lavish water toys may have a higher base rate compared with a yacht of minimal amenities of the same size. If it is unclear as to why two yachts of the same size are vastly different in price, ask your yacht broker to explain what the differences are. Once you are clear on what the base price is and why, it is important to discover what costs will be applicable on top and this is dependent on the type of charter contract used. Your broker will be able to provide you with an accurate estimation of all the costs involved in advance but here is a breakdown of what to expect. In general, you’ll find two basic rates: high season and low season, usually with specific dates set for each. In addition, you’ll find special events that are more expensive: New Year’s Eve, Monaco during the Grand Prix, Cannes during the Film Festival, the Olympics or the America’s Cup.

Sailing tip of the day: Overlaying radar on the chart helps to interpret the display! The biggest problem most of us face when interpreting radar is lack of familiarity. We go about our daily business most of the year, then come aboard, hit the fog and turn it on. Unfortunately, unlike GPS, AIS and the rest, radar is more of a conversation between the operator and the instrument, so it’s not surprising we have trouble interpreting the picture. When I’m motoring, I, therefore, make a practice of keeping my radar transmitting even in good visibility and running an overlay on the chartplotter to keep me familiar with its drawbacks. The image above, for example, clearly shows that what the radar sees may not stack up with what the chart is telling me. Note how the trace seems mysteriously to end halfway up the coast. So it does, but that’s because the echo returning from high cliffs in the south gets lost when the land falls away to lower-lying estuarial terrain. The echo ends either because the flat shoreline isn’t providing a good enough target, or because the coast falls below the scanner’s visual horizon.

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